It is estimated that some 75% of adults will get hemorrhoids at some in their life, but there are ways to prevent hemorrhoids and avoid the discomfort and pain they bring.

Typically, people who eat a low fibre diet and lead a sedentary lifestyle are especially prone to hemorrhoids, as this often leads to chronic constipation.

So, one of the key components of managing or preventing hemorrhoids is to follow a balanced nutrition or dietary plan, one that includes enough fibre to keep your stools soft but formed, enabling you to go to the bathroom on a regular basis. After all, the primary cause of hemorrhoids is considered to be constipation or difficulty in completely evacuating the bowel during motions. Such difficulty causes straining when trying to pass motions, and veins in the rectal area become under pressure and, as a consequence, enlarged.

A key component of a balanced diet is fibre, which helps prevent hemorrhoids, and so the types of food you eat are very important to avoid getting diet-related hemorrhoids. If you already have hemorrhoids, it’s best to change your diet and ensure a higher intake of high fibre foods such as vegetables and whole grains.

But what is fibre?

There are two types of fibre, and, for most people, there is a need to ingest up to 25-30 grams of fibre on a daily basis to help prevent hemorrhoids as a result of constipation.

1 – Insoluble fibre is a type of fibre that does not dissolve and is sometimes called “roughage.” Its role is to help keep digested food moving through your system and to balance the chemistry in your intestines.

2 – Soluble fibre is a material that dissolves in water to form a glue-like substance. Probably the best example of this is oats which become soft and supple when mixed with water. Soluble fibre helps make your stool well-formed and soft and, therefore, easy to pass. Constipation and the associated hemorrhoid problems can be avoided.

Many “high-fibre” foods have both kinds of fibre and, therefore, it is possible by looking at the fibre within certain foods to identify the best food to help prevent hemorrhoids but also bad food to avoid.

Best food for hemorrhoids

Beans, Lentils, and Nuts

Top of the list of good foods for hemorrhoids is food within the so-called “legume family,” namely beans, lentils and nuts. One-half cup of kidney, navy, lima or black beans will cover about 33% of your required daily intake. Depending upon which types of beans you prefer, this will produce somewhere between 7-10 grams of fibre. Even better is that this will be both soluble and insoluble fibre.

A further 3 grams of fibre can be obtained from approximately 20 almonds or pecans or a variety of seeds.

Grains

Whole-grain flours, buckwheat, rye, brown rice or quinoa will help you intake the amount of insoluble fibre you need, as will cooked oats and barley.

Butter-free popcorn is also very useful for your fibre diet, and salads and soups can be sprinkled with oat bran or wheat germ to increase your intake.

Fruits and Vegetables

Apples, pears, plums, and potatoes are all very good food for hemorrhoids, especially when eaten with their skins on. There’s a high proportion of insoluble fibre, as well as compounds called flavonoids, that can help control hemorrhoid bleeding in these skins.

Other produce rich in flavonoids includes berries, grapes, tomatoes, and kale, plus other dark, leafy greens. It’s best to eat such items whole—and fresh, not cooked—and not damage the skins or leaves until they’re ready to be eaten.

An average serving of fruit provides around 3 to 4 grams, or at least 10% of your daily fibre needs, whereas broccoli, Brussels sprouts, zucchini or green peas will produce 4 to 5 grams of fibre.

Some vegetables and fruits such as cucumbers, celery, mild bell peppers, and watermelon are more than 90% water and are also recommended fibre.

It’s a good idea to add fruit or vegetables to any meal, such as berries or bananas to cereal, apple pieces in salad and so on. Dried fruits such as figs, apricots or dates will all make great snacks to help prevent hemorrhoids.

Bad food for hemorrhoids

Foods with low amounts of soluble or insoluble fibre can cause constipation and, as a result, don’t prevent the chances of getting hemorrhoids.

It, therefore, goes without saying that it’s best to avoid or at least limit how much you eat such foods. The most likely causes of dietary constipation include:

Another item that should be limited in your diet is salt. It can make your body thirsty and lead to your body hanging on to water. This, in turn, puts more pressure on your blood vessels, including the veins in your bottom, which cause hemorrhoids.

NA Hemorrhoids Clinic Can Help

It’s a well-known and research-proven fact that the food and beverages you consume can greatly impact your health. There’s no doubt that what you eat and drink directly influences the types of stools you produce. With the onset of hemorrhoids being directly linked to the nature of your stools, maintaining a balanced diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables and appropriate exercise can help prevent hemorrhoids.

It’s always wise, however, to seek specialist advice and, if your hemorrhoids are the result of your lifestyle and diet, NA Hemorrhoids Clinic, which has been in business for over 15 years, and is a specialist in treating hemorrhoids, can help relieve the discomfort and distress which the condition can bring.

Amongst other things, the Clinic uses widely acclaimed traditional Chinese medicine methods, including a herbal ointment called “Ba Zhi San,” combined with modern naturopathic methods to effectively treat hemorrhoids.

So, why not contact us now and let us help you get over the problems associated with hemorrhoids?